Breaded Onion Rings

Total: 45 minutes
Prep: 20 minutes
Cook: 25 minutes
Yield: 2 to 3 servings

This recipe was inspired by the canned onion strings on top of a traditional green bean casserole. The canned onions are greasy, salty, and highly processed, and I knew there had to be a delicious alternative. These onion rings are it! In fact, the first time I threw them together, my family ate them all before they even made it to the top of the casserole. I was so excited about the idea of onion rings for casseroles, snacks, and side dishes that I decided to include this recipe in the cookbook.

Ingredients

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Process the toasted bread slices in a food processor until fine crumbs form. Add the nutritional yeast, parsley, garlic powder, onion powder, Italian herb blend, and sea salt (if using).
  3. Transfer the crumb mixture to a shallow dish. Put the flour in another shallow dish, and the milk in a third shallow dish.
  4. Completely coat the onion rings with flour, then dip them in the milk, and finally coat them in the bread crumbs. You can do several onions rings at once.
  5. Place the breaded onion rings on the prepared baking sheet and bake for 15 to 25 minutes, until golden brown and crispy. Serve warm.

Tips

  • You can save time by starting with 3 cups whole wheat breadcrumbs instead of making the crumbs from toast. Or, for gluten-free onion rings, replace the breadcrumbs with crushed Rice Chex cereal.

Kim Campbell is the author of The Plantpure Kitchen: 130 Mouthwatering Whole Food recipes and tips for a plant-based life, published in 2017. This inspirational book is packed with attractive food photos taken by her daughter Whitney. She happens to be the daughter-in-law of Dr. T. Colin Campbell, considered by many as the “science father” of the rapidly grow­ing plant-based nutrition movement. She works with her husband, Nelson, in a health and wellness business promoting a whole-food, plant-based diet. Kim holds a bachelor’s degree from Cornell Univer­sity in Human Service Studies, with a minor in Nutrition and Child Development.
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