Oncology

Animal Rights in Research

As an animal rights activist, I am very curious about your rat studies. My question is hypothetical. If the politics of research funding were not so animal model dependent, and you would have been funded for the China Study without first doing the rat research, do you feel your conclusions would have been significant enough without the rat work to have come to the same conclusions in your book?

In other words, you say there was no way that you could have done the work without the rats, but the massive epidemiological study, to me, seems so much more significant and applicable to human health, that I wonder if the rat work was truly necessary?

This is a question that I have long thought about. The answer is “No”, the China Study would not have been so clear, although I say this because of somewhat indirect considerations. It is true that [...]

Prostate Cancer

The toll from prostate cancer is immense. In the U.S., one out of every ten men will be diagnosed with this devastating disease.
  • Diet Matters
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    Diet Matters: Clarifying the Link Between Breast Cancer and Eating Patterns

Diet Matters: Clarifying the Link Between Breast Cancer and Eating Patterns

An INVITATION to the READER and the INVESTIGATORS OF THE HARVARD NURSES’ HEALTH STUDY

It was June 1982. At a news conference in Washington, a group of internationally recognized scientists had just finished announcing the National Research Council’s report on diet, nutrition, and cancer1. The report received extensive news coverage, lots of criticism from the industry most affected by the report’s conclusion and – according to some authorities-the highest number of requests for a report ever released by the august National Academy of Sciences (NAS), our sponsor.

Why the attention? Spending about two years, six three-day meetings, a million dollars, and a rather substantial amount of time reviewing what turned out to be a rather large amount of information, we had simply summarized the scientific evidence on the association of diet with cancer. The intense interest that followed was due to our rather provocative recommendations to cut down on fat intake [...]

  • American Medical Association
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    Letter to the Editor: Journal of the American Medical Association

Letter to the Editor: Journal of the American Medical Association

Re: Holmes DH, Hunter DJ, Colditz GA, et al. Association of dietary intake of fat and fatty acids with risk of breast cancer. JAMA 1999; 281:914-920.

Holmes et al1, using data from the Nurses’ Health Study, report no significant association between breast cancer risk and type of dietary fat consumed, a finding mostly (but not entirely) consistent with earlier reports2-3 on this important study. This and earlier reports have shown that lower fat diets are not associated with lower risks for breast cancer, as originally hypothesized by this group2.

Although this observation is important and, by now, well documented, it may be even more important to note the shortcomings of the underlying hypothesis for this study. Namely, the original hypothesis was rather narrowly focused on the proposition that dietary fat was an independent and perhaps major cause of breast cancer. This hypothesis was based on findings of international correlation4 and migrant5-6 [...]

  • Research
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    What Does Research Indicate About Animal Protein and “Reproductive” Cancers?

What Does Research Indicate About Animal Protein and “Reproductive” Cancers?

Answer to a Reader’s Question:

“In ecologic data, correlations exist between per capita meat…consumption and prostate cancer mortality rate [1 study cited]. In case control and prospective studies, the major contributors of animal protein, meat, dairy products and eggs have frequently been associated with a higher rate of prostate cancer…[23 studies cited].” (quoted from Giovannucci, E. Dietary influences of 1,25 (OH)2 vitamin D in relation to prostate cancer: a hypothesis. Cancer Causes and Control, 9: 567-582, 1998).

Here is a quote from my book (Campbell, TC and Campbell TM II, The China Study, Startling Implications of Diet, Weight Loss and Long-Term Health, 2005, 417 pp.):

“Under unhealthy conditions…IGF-1 becomes more active, increasing the birth and growth of new cells while simultaneously inhibiting the removal of old cells, both of which favor the development of cancer [7 studies cited]. …consuming animal-based foods increases the blood levels of this growth hormone, IGF-1 [3 [...]

Food vs. Chemical Carcinogens

Answer to a Reader’s Question:

Chemicals as carcinogens are widely believed to be the main cause of human cancer. However, when directly compared, nutrient imbalances are far, far more substantial in their effect than chemicals. I have taken this argument, as a seminar, directly to the two major chemical carcinogen testing organizations in the world (the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France (a WHO organization) and the National Toxicology Testing Program (once in Research Triangle Park and once in Jefferson, Arkansas (an FDA/ NIH program) in order to get their critical comment. I only get comments that validate our work — almost all of which was supported by NIH funding. I also have been on 3 expert panels of the National Academy of Sciences where this topic was considered and have published extensively on the topic in professional peer-reviewed journals.

The China Study mentions a small fraction [...]